The Daughter is a gripping tale that follows residents of a town in the aftermath of the discovery of a body in the local allotments. Twists and turns follow every turn of the page…

For my part in the blog tour, I’ve got an interview with the author, Billy McLaughlin! Thank you to Emma for conducting the interview! I definitely recommend giving The Daughter and any other books by Billy a whirl, they’re fantastic!

Hello, thanks for inviting me along to take part. How are you?

How important are the names in your book? Do you choose that the names based on liking the way it sounds or the meaning? Do you have any name choosing resources you can recommend?

The names just kind of pop into my head. I visualise the characters and character traits and maybe they’ll remind me of someone. There’s been no big revelation about names though. I have no recommendations for resources. A friend of mine did call me though, after reading one of my books and asked why all the characters had four-letter names. It hadn’t occurred to me, but quite often they have had. Maybe it’s just because they sound snappier or easy to remember.

Are you a plotter or pantser?

I’m a plotter. I’m also now having sleepless nights. I hope my phone is never stolen otherwise the thief will have a psychotic mess to unravel because whenever something pops into my head I quickly put it on the notepad section of the phone. It’s now a bible of potential plots, dialogues and book titles.

Do you read your reviews? Do you respond to them if they are particularly good or bad? How do you deal with the bad?

I read every review. Some people might think I’ve got nothing to do. However, I use those reviews to promote but also as a guide to get better. Or to acknowledge what went well in a book. The most response I will give is a like or a thank you to a reviewer. Or share their review. I don’t think it’s constructive to respond or to get into a conversation about reviews because everybody is entitled to their opinion. I was upset by a recent review. Not because I can’t handle negative reviews. I think they’re just as important and sometimes valid as positive ones. This one was not constructive, and I felt it insulted the hard work of other people who contribute to my work. I value the people I work with very much. The books do or die by their input sometimes. I was a little annoyed. I didn’t respond to that reviewer, but I had a little rant among friends on one of the online groups.

What is your least favourite part of the writing/publishing process?

The least favourite part is the publishing day. That’s the clincher. You can write until you implode. You can promote to death. Publishing day and the initial reviews are when you know whether people got it or not. That’s very nerve-wrackin. I’m like a little tortoise on that day, peeking out but ready to snap my head back in if it gets too bad. I’ve been pleased with most of the responses so far.

What are your favourite and least favourite types of scenes to write?

I hate sex scenes. So much so that I’ve hardly touched them. Ouch! It makes me cringe to even think about it. That’s the beauty of writing thrillers or murder mystery, we don’t have to really get into the fifty shades of whatever. I’ll leave those scenes to the experts. My favourite scenes to write are conflict scenes. The ones where people interact, and they get a little sarcastic. That’s where I infuse most of myself. Sometimes it can just be a little dialogue to flesh out the characters. Sometimes it’s for the purpose of driving the story.

If you could have one superpower, what would it be and why?

One superpower? These are great questions. I don’t know. Let me think. Maybe I’d like to be able to change faces. I could be other people. Then I could fight crime using someone else’s identity. Maybe somebody could find a way of writing that story. Anyway, thanks very much for having me. Hope you all enjoy the new book if you get a chance to read it. x

To see who else is on the blog tour, check out the image below:

The Daughter Banner

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